Nissan Juke Mileage and Octane Requirement

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Nissan Juke Mileage and Octane Requirement

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PostPosted: Sat May 01, 2010 2:32 am
Please let us know the answer if you know.

I don't see any solid numbers, but we can probably reason most of this out. Let's compare the car to its most similar competitors. The SX4, Mazda 3, and soul are probably the closest in size and price point. All of them get around 30 MPG, and have slightly larger engines that produce less power. It stands to reason that Nissan will try very hard to best them or at the very least match them. I would expect mileage to be some thing like 23/31. Maybe it will be a little more or a little less, but that is probably a good estimate based on estimated size and weight.

The real problem is going to be that nearly all of the competing cars can run on 87 octane, and since the turbo engine was developed for the European market it is possible that 91 octane gas will be required. Very few turbo cars can run well on 87 octane, but many are able to reduce the cars performance to deal with it. We will have to wait and see, but my bet is that the Juke is going to require or recommend high octane fuel to run properly.

Let's hope I'm wrong. Maybe they can work some magic with VVT, and keeping the boost pressures low when fed low octane fuel, and maybe they will find a way to squeeze a few extra miles out of it. If they want to compete in the European market they are going to need to get at least 30MPG.
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 02, 2010 1:32 pm
Inside Line wrote:Nissan won't tell us how quick this Juke is, but we're guessing it's getting us to 60 mph in fewer than 8 seconds. Company officials will say they're targeting 30 mpg, and that's for EPA city and highway combined.


Sounds like the juke should be a quick little car.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 02, 2010 12:17 pm
The Juke will, more than likely, require high-octane fuel to run properly. This is the case for all high-compression engines.

A potential owner may want to consider modifying the vehicle to run on Autogas, a propane-butane compound. Because the Juke has a direct injection, high-compression, turbo engine, Autogas is the ideal fuel to propel this vehicle. Autogas has an octane rating over 100!

Further incentive to perform this type of modification includes increased savings at the pump as well as less polution to the environment.

I know I'm going to modify my Juke when the time comes!
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 02, 2010 1:53 pm
If you do please make sure to post a tutorial on how it is done. I'm sure there would be a lot of interested members.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 05, 2010 5:09 pm
If I can find a tutorial, I will be sure to post it.

Modifying the vehicle to run on Autogas is not a DIY job. I hope I did not give this impression. You take the vehicle to a garage that specializes in this type of conversion. I intend to purchase the AWD Juke in October this year when it comes to Athens, Greece, where I reside. I have done a little investigating and have located an authorized Nissan dealer that performs this modification itself (hence under warrantee). With dwindling sales (due to the financial crisis), I will attempt to convince the dealer to perform this modification free of charge with my purchase.

I am certain that there are a many more garages in the US, than there are here in Greece, that will perform this type of conversion. After all, running a vehicle of CNG, LPG or Biofuel is not exactly new technology :o)

A few more interesting facts for those interested:

1) Approximatlely the same volume of Autogas (LPG) as that of gasoline are required to cover the same distance travelled; gasoline providing a very slight advantage. However, LPG is significantly cheaper than gasoline (about 1/3 the price of gasoline in some countries); hence, the savings.

2) There are special tanks that are fitted into the spare-tire recess of the vehicle in order to save trunk space. Granted you have to leave your spare tire at home. Consequently, it is prudent to carry a tire repair kit in the vehicle or invest in run-flat tires.

3) All/Any safety issues concerning running the vehicles on LPG have been resolved - especially true if purchasing a 5th-generation LPG modification kit. In fact, because of the way LPG tanks are constructed and the safety release valves utilized, running a vehicle on LPG is actually safer than running it on gasoline.

4) Larger service intervals result when operating the vehicle on LPG. I will not go into the technicalities here.

Food for thought. Here in Greece gasoline is presently €1.50/liter!!! Driving a vehicle is turning into a luxury.
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 4:45 am
All jobs are DIY if you have a book and know the right people :) I happen to work at a research center that works with similar projects http://www.undeerc.org/. I would not convert a new car, but I am not familiar with the new systems maybe they are better than early versions. (I haven't even looked at kits since 2005)

If you can do it without voiding the warranty then go for it, but if you can not I would probably leave it alone.

Very few people have converted to Natural Gas/Autogas in my area so I don't know much about it.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 08, 2010 12:53 pm
I don't follow your thought regarding it not being a viable solution. To my thinking, the opposite is true. If everyone was getting their NG from the city heating grid, this would be a good thing (convenience).

Anyway, for those interested in modifying their vehicles to run on LPG, you might want to take a look at the following links.

http://www.icomnorthamerica.com/system.html

http://ygraeriokinisi.gr/en.fsi.html
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 08, 2010 2:39 pm
My thought process is that I don't let anyone work on my cars other than myself and people I trust. Even complex jobs are best viewed as a learning experience. I don't know how things work in Grease, but auto mechanics in the US are most often high school drop outs, and typically don't take much pride in their work.

The Natural Gas infrastructure in my area probably could not handle the additional load of everyone utilizing NG in their vehicles. It can already be stress on the coldest days.

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Location: Victorville, CA
PostPosted: Sun Oct 31, 2010 10:24 pm
I don't see anything specific listed to compression, but usually turbo charged engines DO NOT have high compression. My FWD 6-speed is averaging around 26 mpg, but I usually drive 80 mph on the freeways. Also, regular is required but super is recommended for performance. I have not tried super yet, and honestly don't plan to; my last 2 cars and of course all my motorcycles require super, so I am glad to be back on regular with the amount of miles I drive.
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 31, 2010 10:39 pm
Good to know I thought the JUKE required Super.
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